Automation is Posing An Economic, Cultural, Identity and Gender Problem
 

Robots are coming for human jobs. It’s no surprise. However, the automation revolution is much more than just an economic problem, argues Laurie Penny in Wired.

“It is a cultural problem, an identity problem, and—critically—a gender problem,” she writes.

The robots are mostly eliminating jobs in farm and factory labor, construction and haulage—in other words, blue-collar jobs typically performed by men.

“Millions of men around the world are staring into the lacquered teeth of obsolescence, terrified of losing not only their security but also their source of meaning and dignity in a world that tells them that if they’re not rich, they’d better be doing something quintessentially manly for money. Otherwise they’re about as much use as a wooden coach-and-four on the freeway.”

Men must change their mindset and be willing to take on jobs in the so-called “pink-collar” industry, she says.

StartUp HERE Toronto is a publishing partner of techPORTFOLIO and this article was originally published on their site.